Fort Steele

Designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1925, more than 40 years passed before restoration of Fort Steele got underway in the late 1960s. Today, the Fort Steele townsite boasts more than 60 restored/reconstructed buildings, a small railway line, heritage livestock and gardens, a museum and on-going demonstrations of old-time trades. Fort Steele sees more than 80,000 visitors each year. Mrs. GeoK had a great time exploring the heritage site with her camera in hand…

Downtown Fort Steele

The town office, a jewellers, a door and sash fabricator and a couple of other shops sit shoulder to shoulder in downtown Fort Steele.

Perry Creek water wheel

This restored water wheel was originally situated at the Perry Creek Gold Mine, 25 km west of Fort Steele. The wheel turned two electric generators that pumped 600 gallons per minute of water from the mine.

Weathered pioneer house

The weathered pioneer house seems ready to blow down in the next big wind storm. This photo captured the striking contrast between the vibrant spring green leaves on the trees and faded buildings.

Barracks door

This little used door sits at the north end of one of the bunk house buildings at the NWMP barracks at Fort Steele.

Faded paint and rusted door knob

The intricate detailing of the rusted backing plate & door knob contrasts sharply against the faded paint of the door.

Rocking horse

This hand made rocking horse sits on the porch of the Pioneer House, waiting for a time-travelling child to climb aboard.

Layers

Only the passage of 125 years can create such layers – faded vertical and horizontal boards, an old pipe and a long-ago discarded metal wheel rim from a wagon.

Gate hinge

A rusted, heavy-gauge spring hinge secures the gate that opens into the yard of a pioneer house at Fort Steele.

Faded door

The shiny black knob seems out-of-place against the faded red and white paint and rusted key hole on this warped door.

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4 thoughts on “Fort Steele

    • Thanks very much. I have been blogging for a few years now, but am not very familiar with reblogging. I guess it’s time to look into this a little more.

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