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Review: Banff, Yoho & Kootenay National Parks Recreation Map and Visitor Guide from Clark Geomatics

This is a big map, packed with tons of content: charts, timelines, planning and wildlife viewing tips, 80 sights and attractions and more than 100 hikes. The main attraction is the beautiful, shaded relief map of Banff, Yoho & Kootenay National Parks, along with Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park and a few bits of Kananaskis Country, all at a scale of 1:250,000. There are at least three reasons to buy this map: It’s a great resource if you’re planning a trip to the Canadian Rockies. It makes a great souvenir. It offers ideas to foster your exploration and appreciation of the Canadian Rockies.

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Cycling the Rocky Mountain Legacy Trail – 2017 Edition

This year, we cycled the Rocky Mountain Legacy Trail from mid-May through mid-October, when the trail officially closed for the winter. Thanks to a wide range of extensions available on either end, our rides ranged from 53 to 86 km and included a good mix of destinations in both Canmore and Banff. Amazing scenery and minimal elevation change make this a “must ride” trail for those visiting Canmore/Banff during the riding season.

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Photo Blogging Challenge – Photographer’s Choice (October 2017)

Autumn is our favourite season, and it comes early to this part of the world. Peak colour usually happens in September. But in October, later sunrises and earlier sunsets make it easy to get out at just the right time to enhance lingering fall colours with golden hour light. Since Canadian Thanksgiving falls on the second Monday in October, “Thanksgiving” was the obvious connecting theme for these photographs, all made over the Thanksgiving long weekend spent in Canmore.

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ILLUMINATIONS: human/nature

ILLUMINATIONS: human/nature was conceived for people like me! Billed as a participative art experience incorporating history and nature, I expected a mash-up of art and nature featuring tons of lights and projected images, triggered by walking or touching something while enjoying the great outdoors in Banff National Park. While most of those elements were part of the experience, for me, the participative aspect fell short. Our group focused primarily on doing what needed to be done to move on to the next way station and there wasn’t much discussion or sharing of perspectives. I do really like the overall concept of a short-run, multi-media, site relevant art installation celebrating Canada’s parks quite appealing and hope for they’ll be another opportunity to experience art in nature before Canada 200 rolls around.